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Feb 03

Prophecies & Omens Blog Carnival Summary

 

The 2017 January Blog Carnival was hosted by Tales of a GM. My final duty as host is to bring together all of the essays submitted to the Carnival. The theme I chose for January was Prophecies & Omens.

 

I announced the topic, and provided some options, in the launch article.

 

In total, Prophecies & Omens received 18 submissions, some of them I found elsewhere on the internet, and added to the launch article myself. For the purpose of this summary, I grouped the articles according to their content, then listed them in the chronological sequence found in the comments of the launch post. These categories are:

  • Prophecies in RPGs
  • Types of Prophecy
  • Campaign Prophecies
  • Omens

 

 

 

Prophecies in RPGs

This first category covers broad articles relating the general use of prophecies in your game. There are many issues to consider when weaving this element into a campaign. These articles deal with the fundamentals of prophecies:

  • Gonzalo Campoverde at Codex Anathema explored the nature of prophecies, and how to use them in a campaign.
  • Clark Timmins at RPG Geek submitted a lengthy essay, with links, looking at the history of prophecy in D&D.
  • John Crowley III at Notes of the Wandering Alchemist posted another superb overview of the topic.
  • Alex Welk at Anarchy Dice combined the broad topic of prophecies with a more improv approach.
  • Tim Brannan at The Other Side segues from a book review into useful advice for GMs when using prophecies.
  • Jaye and the team at 6d6 RPG posted a counter-argument to the use of prophecies in RPGs:

 

 

Types of Prophecy

Several contributions explored particular styles of prophecy and fortune-telling. These essays look at a specific category.

  • Tony Brotherton at Roleplay Geek presented an article about how to use Tarot cards in Fantasy RPGs.
  • My first piece for Prophecies & Omens explored Ancient Roman bird auguries.
  • Part 2 presented a set of five random tables to create a bird augury.
  • Mythusmage Today posted a clever magical item which transforms the sacrificial reading of entrails into a humane ritual.
  • My third contribution explored the ancient oracle at Delphi.

 

Campaign Prophecies

The third category includes essays about weaving prophecies into a campaign, frequently with personal examples of this process.

 

 

Omens

Despite equal billing in the title, omens received only limited attention in the Carnival. However, one blogger posted articles balancing the coverage. Thus, Marc has this category all to himself.

  • Marc Plourde at Inspiration Strikes focused on the Omens part of the topic.
  • In his second contribution to the Carnival, Marc posted a table of 20 omens suitable for the Numenera setting.

 

 

Conclusion

The Blog Carnival drew in another fantastic range of articles. Yet again, I had fun interacting with so many bloggers. This is how friendships and collaborations start. I enjoy reading the articles, but making new friends is even better.

 

How would you use prophecy in your campaign? Which omens will you use first? Do you have a favourite article? Has the thematic grouping of articles proved useful to you? Share your thoughts with fellow GMs in the comments below.

 

 

Happy Gaming

Phil

 

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2 comments

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  1. timsbrannan

    Looks like I have some quality reading to do!

    Thanks for this.

    1. Phil

      Hi Tim,

      Yes, there was a great range of articles for the Blog Carnival. Bringing them all together in the summary post makes it so much easier to browse the full range of essays.

      Happy Reading
      Phil

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